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Reports: San Diego mayor signs resignation letter

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner has signed his letter of resignation and will step down Friday afternoon, according to news reports.
 
The Los Angeles Times and U-T San Diego reported the letter was signed pending the City Council's approval of a deal reached between Filner's lawyers and the city over a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by a former Filner aide.
 
The San Diego City Council meets at 1 p.m. PT/4 p.m. ET in a closed session to vote on the agreement, reached this week after mediation sessions involving Filner, his lawyers, representatives of the city and attorney Gloria Allred, the lawyer for Irene McCormack Jackson, the mayor's ex-communication director.
 
The Los Angeles Times and two local TV stations have reported Filner agreed to step aside and end weeks of turmoil that has engulfed San Diego, nicknamed "America's Finest City." At least 18 women have accused Filner of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior, including groping, unwanted kissing and suggestive comments.
 
It's not been determined how much, if any, taxpayer money will be used to help Filner with his legal obligations. Sources told the Los Angeles Times the city has agreed to pay "some, if not all" of Filner's share of damages awarded in the lawsuit.
 
City Attorney Jan Goldsmith said Friday that the city needs to "begin to heal."
 
"We look at stability as the mayor resigning and a special election, that's what we're facing," Goldsmith said without divulging details of the deal. "That's stability for San Diego right now. If that happens, then we're on our way to stability. … We cannot have six months to a year more of this issue."
 
Filner would become the fourth San Diego mayor since the 1980s to resign before his term ended.
 
Filner, 70, was elected last year after serving 10 terms in Congress. He is the first Democrat elected to lead the nation's eighth-largest city in 20 years. Filner served on the San Diego school board and City Council and taught at San Diego State University before he was elected to Congress in 1992.
 
He could be eligible for a federal pension of about $59,000 a year because of his congressional service, according to calculations by Pete Sepp of the National Taxpayers Union.
 
Filner could be eligible for a combined pension of about $82,000 a year when the pensions from his previous City Council stint and state university work are included, the ABC News affiliate in San Diego reported.

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